Report: Use of indoor tanning beds increases risk of melanoma

Report: Use of indoor tanning beds increases risk of melanoma

News and Articles
May 27 2010

Use of indoor tanning beds increases risk of melanoma between twofold and fourfold depending on the device and length of time indoor tanning is used, according to a report in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

In the largest study of its kind on this issue, researchers found that among 1,167 melanoma cases and 1,101 healthy controls, those who had tanned indoors had a 74 percent increased risk of melanoma. If the devices emitted primarily UVA radiation, the risk was 4.4-fold.

Risk increased along with greater years of use, number of sessions or total hours of use.

The Food and Drug Administration is currently considering a ban on indoor tanning beds among teenagers. Results from this study suggest the greater risk of melanoma observed among teenagers is more likely due to increased years of tanning rather than biology. Currently, indoor tanning use is much more common among teenage girls and young women than boys or men.

The AACR will host a press conference on the report on Thursday, May 27 at 11a.m. ET, which will be moderated by Tim Rebbeck, Ph.D., editor-in-chief of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, and professor of epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania.

Reporters can participate in the press conference by using the following information:

U.S. and Canada: (888) 282-7404

International: (706) 679-5207

Access Code: 72070805

The following scientists will participate:

Lead author DeAnn Lazovich, Ph.D., associate professor of epidemiology and community health in the School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center at the University of Minnesota:

“It had been previously thought that those tanning with UVB, rather than UVA, radiation would be at increased risk for melanoma. Our study shows that there is no such thing as a safe device.”

Electra Paskett, Ph.D., associate director for population sciences at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute:

“Too many teenagers tend to live a life ignorant of risk. They believe that because they are not old they will never be old. We need to encourage a shift in social norms about tanning similar to what was done with smoking because the risk is that high.”

Allan Halpern, M.D., chief of the dermatology service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center:

“We see over 120,000 melanoma cases in the United States every year and over 8,500 deaths. Tanning bed use is definitely one of the factors fueling this epidemic.”

Source:

Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

Source: www.news-medical.net

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